The CMS deja vu phenomenon

At the turn of the century it was estimated that there were over 7 million Websites in the world. In October of this year, Netcraft estimates that there are now nearly 50 million active sites on the Internet. However, I can't help but wonder how many of those 50 million sites are actually unique sites?

Sure, from time to time we are all guilty of recycling a post with the same content from one site to another. Increasingly though, I have come across sites that share not just a little bit of content but are almost exact duplicates of each other. On some cases, the only difference between the sites I'm comparing are their domain name. Let me give you an example of the déjà vu we are now seeing.

I came across a very good article about developing our own content management system titled, "Hands on: How to roll your own CMS". The article is written by Nigel Whitfield and I found it on the UK site, Personal Computer World. So far, I've found the article on four other sites. The four sites are:

One step closer to Firefox 2.0

In case you missed the brief announcement, the second release candidate for Firefox 2.0 went public last Friday. The release notes for Firefox 2.0 RC2 are available at Mozilla.com while download links have been made available at Mozilla.org.

We've written enough about the new features in Firefox 2 that we like so we won't elaborate further. If you are interested in reading those articles on Firefox 2 please check out the articles from the list below:


Fifth Anniversary for Plone Content Management System

Plone is celebrating their fifth anniversary this week. Plone is an open source content management system (CMS) built on the Python based Zope application server. The two people that are probably celebrating the most about Plone's success are its project leaders and founders, Alan Runyan (a US Texan) and Alexander Limi (a Norwegian).

The following are some talking points straight from about the positive accomplishments of the Plone open source project during the past five years. The talking points are straight from their fifth year anniversary announcement with only a little editing on my part. I realize that there are other open source projects that may have accomplished just as much as Plone during the past five years. However, this is Plone's time to shine. Also, this is rare occasion I get to promote a non-PHP Web application to our visitors here at CMS Report.

FCKeditor's Drupal Web Site

Drupal IconIn case you missed the news, the Website for FCKeditor is now using the Drupal content management system (CMS). FCKeditor is a HTML text editor with a WYSIWYG interface and is commonly utilized in Web-based applications. The following was posted at the FCKeditor site:

We're proud to announce that, from today, the FCKeditor web site is running over Drupal, one of the best Open Source CMSs out there. After a long research, Drupal has proved to be the best solution to handle our half a million page views monthly, with flexibility and reliability.

This important change will make it possible to provide even better services to our community.

Daniel Glazman, Mozilla Composer, and Nvu's future

I have been sitting on this story for some time. Daniel Glazman has been writing a number of posts recently on a brand new project he's just starting. Daniel Glazman was involved in the development of the Netscape and Mozilla Composer (now called SeaMonkey) as well as the author of the Nvu Web authoring system. All these composers contain a WYSIWYG HTML editor and in many ways can be the considered the open source versions of Microsoft's Frontpage and Adobe's Dreamweaver.

I personally like to use Nvu now and then. I often recommend Nvu to those that need an easy way to compose Web pages and wish to avoid "writing in code" as much as possible. I don't use Nvu or any WYSISYG editor too much these days because I have found that about everything I need to produce online content is self contained with today's content management systems. However, there are times when you don't want to do your work online, making the HTML editors a valuable tool when you need them.

Getting back to the point of this post, Daniel Glazeman has made several posts on his blog letting readers know that he is no longer working with either Nvu or the SeaMonkey projects. Instead, he wishes to work on a brand new composer. In a post he writes:

BusinessWeek: McAfee and Symantec Confront Microsoft

This is an interesting debate. Is Microsoft really being a monopoly when it comes to securing and patching its own operating system? Shouldn't we expect to be able to buy a computer operating system that is secure so we don't need anti-virus software in the first place? It is interesting, the marketplace for consumer products that Microsoft inadvertently created is upset at Microsoft for reducing the need to buy third-party. So what, consumers should have a less secure operating system and be required to buy a third party anti-virus software? BusinessWeek reports:

Joomla! 1.5 Beta Arriving in October

It was announced by Joomla.org that the Beta for Joomla! 1.5 is expected to be released on October 12th. Some of the goals and features that are to be included in this new version of the content management system are:

  • Substantial improvement in usability, manageability, and scalability. The project team's goal is to improve Joomla! "far beyond the original Mambo foundations".

  • Expanded accessibility to support internationalisation, double-byte characters and Right-to-Left support for Arabic and Hebrew languages.

  • Additional integration of external applications through Web Services and remote authentication such as the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).

  • Enhanced content delivery, template and presentation capabilities to support accessibility standards and content delivery to any destination.

  • A more sustainable and flexible framework for component and extension developers.

When IT changes too quickly

As I have mentioned in the past, besides this site I also run a site called "WebCMS Forum" [now defunct]. The forum is a place I started in hopes of bringing users of various content management systems (CMS) together for exciting discussion. While the number of users participating in actual dicussion have always been low, those people that are posting often write something that makes hosting this underused forum well worth my time.

This week I had a user, Anti, talk about frustrations with rapid changes currently happening with the content management system, Drupal. Don't get her wrong, she likes Drupal. However, for the first time in a long while, she is in need of taking a deep breath before absorbing all the new changes into her routine. At the forum she writes:

Using Firefox 2 with Content Management Systems

Screenshot of CMSReport.com in Firefox 2 RC1

As you can tell from the screenshot below, I am using a release candidate of Mozilla's Firefox 2 while viewing and editing content in my Drupal site. If you look closely at the image or click on the image to enlarge it, you will also see that I don't always focus my browsing on Drupal. Take a look at the tabs and you'll see me taking a look at a number of other open source projects (such as Joomla and e107). I have been known to have 20 tabs open referencing just as many different portals, forums, and blog applications as I can find. What can I say, I'm obsessed with Web content management systems (CMS).

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