Service Provider

Findings from TERMINALFOUR's 2017 Global Higher Education Survey

Submitted by Bryan Ruby on Thu, 09/28/2017 - 17:02

Results highlight significant concerns among higher education institutions about student recruitment targets due to proposed visa/travel restrictions as well as accessibility priorities.

TERMINALFOUR, a digital marketing and web content management platform has a long history of serving the higher education community. This week they announced the results of its 2017 Global Higher Education Survey. The results highlight significant concerns among higher education institutions about student recruitment targets due to proposed visa/travel restrictions.  In a survey of 391 higher education professionals from 333 unique higher education institutions, 56% stated that travel restrictions will directly impact their institution’s ability to meet recruitment targets.

The survey was carried out among web, marketing, recruitment and leadership professionals in higher education across the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Ireland, Australia and South Africa.

The survey also found that 37% of higher education professionals have high levels of job insecurity. When asked to rate their personal job security in the context of Government policy, student recruitment challenges and internal restructuring, just 28% of respondents stated that they feel highly secure in their current role.

Four Mistakes to Avoid When Picking a CMS

Submitted by Guest Author on Tue, 02/28/2017 - 22:43

There are many reasons why you should consider using a content management system (CMS). The top reason for using the CMS is because it makes the creating and editing of content simple and easy. You will also have access to an arsenal of remarkable web design tools to make your work easier. All in all, how well the CMS serves you will depend on the service provider you end up choosing. If you are searching for the right CMS to use, you have to avoid the following mistakes.

1. Choosing a geek-friendly CMS

As a developer, the first thing you need to remember is that not everyone is tech savvy. Even if you find a remarkable platform that you like, you have to account for the needs of your customers. Will they be able to comfortably use it once your work is done? You have to make sure that the customer will be able to use the platform without any problem. In the long run, it pays to pick a CMS that has a simple admin interface. At times, you may have to customize the interface more in order to meet the needs of your customer.

Custom CMSs Are Back - And It's A Good Thing

Submitted by Pete Czech on Fri, 02/10/2017 - 14:35

I recently came upon this article written by a CMS developer who was amazed that a potential client chose a custom CMS over their recommended solution. I see these articles on occasion, and they always aggravate me to a certain extent.

The reason is because custom CMSs continue to make a ton of sense for enterprise clients—more so now than ever before.

The real shock here is that more developers don’t see custom CMS solutions as a viable option. They are stuck in a bubble overrun with off-the-shelf solutions. Oftentimes, they can’t even tell that the professed “benefits” of off-the-shelf software are the same detriments that lead to customers eventually wish they had traveled down the custom development path from the beginning.

The writer of the article posed some interesting questions and arguments which we’d like to answer, starting with this:

Have you ever built a CMS before? Have you ever used a custom CMS? The answer to both is no. Because if it was yes, you would not even consider doing it.

To the contrary, we’ve been building custom CMS platforms for over 15 years. When we began, the custom pathway was pretty much the only option for website developers. There weren’t any off-the-shelf solutions such as WordPress, Drupal, or Joomla. Those platforms developed over time and did indeed make life a lot easier. However, one could argue that they also ushered in an era of “sameness” on the Internet. An era where a true “web developer” can’t be distinguished from a “themer” by most business owners.