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Web Content Management | CMS Report

  • The Weather Channel is using Drupal and Acquia Platform

    The Weather Channel is using Drupal and Acquia Platform

    When I talk about Drupal, information technology and the weather all in the same breath, I'm known to be very enthusiastic and opinionated in such discussions. I can't help myself. I'm biased toward Drupal as it is one of my favorite content management systems. I'm also a former meteorologist working in information technology for a very large organization that is heavily involved with the weather. Needless to say, a year or two ago when I heard that The Weather Channel started using Drupal to meet the needs of it's customers and meteorologists, it caught my attention. I think the use of Drupal is a win-win for everyone around and given my background, I wish my own employer had adopted a similar solution. If for no other reason, it would have given me a chance to work with one of the hottest open source content management systems on the planet.

    The news keeps getting better for Drupal fans. This week both Acquia and Mediacurrent announced that the The Weather Channel is standardizing on the Acquia Platform for Weather.com. Weather.com started using Drupal last year to increase the agility of its content creation and publishing. Now, the company has moved the entire website, which serves more than 20 million pages of content, to the Acquia Platform, which brings together Drupal and Acquia’s solutions for digital engagement and experience management. The team at Weather.com worked with Acquia and digital agency partner Mediacurrent for its site development and migration from its legacy web content management system Percussion.

    By Bryan Ruby
    Posted November 21, 2014

  • The How Much Does a Website Cost Infographic

    The How Much Does a Website Cost Infographic

    Over the years, I've talked about building a range of simple websites for personal use to implementing very complicated proprietary and open source enterprise content management systems. What I haven't talked about is the cost of building and maintaining those websites. Honestly, I've been too embarrassed for how little I spend and too stunned by the price tag for what the big companies pay for their websites. Who Is Hosting This? sent us a graphicthat we thought represented the typical costs small to medium size businesses can expect when building and hosting their new websites. So good was the infographic that we decided to post it here.

    Much of the statistics came from Which Web Design Company. WWDC maintains a database of over 7000 web design agencies world-wide, and provided them with the average starting cost statistics for web development used in the graphic below. Whatever your costs and whatever you decide, assuming you're working with reputable companies, the bottom line is that you get what you pay for. That's not a threat, but just a reality of the market.

    By Bryan Ruby
    Posted November 18, 2014

  • Bryan Ruby: Social Media Killed My Family Website

    Bryan Ruby: Social Media Killed My Family Website

    For the first time in 15 years, my family doesn't have a website to call their own. In January 2000, I registered the domain Bryansplace.com. This was the first website I ever built outside of work and it became a sandbox for me to express my interests as well as a way to seek personal growth. From handwritten HTML pages into Frontpage to a number of CMSs, the software and content at Bryansplace evolved as my life evolved.

    Bryansplace.com was the website where my girlfriend and I announced our marriage to the world. As a married couple, we eventually publicly announced the birth of our son via the site. This domain was the site where I talked about camping, computers, and my latest beer recipes. It wasn't all about me either. My wife showcased her photography for the first time online via  our family website. This was also the website my son learned how to navigate the Drupal content management system and talk about his gaming skills. Bryansplace.com was synonymous with "family news". Despite how much I valued the domain, last week I unceremoniously killed the website.

    By Bryan Ruby
    Posted November 15, 2014

  • End of Life for TYPO3 CMS 4.7 and 6.1, Eyes toward TYPO3 CMS 7

    End of Life for TYPO3 CMS 4.7 and 6.1, Eyes toward TYPO3 CMS 7

    TYPO3 has announced the discontinuation of TYPO3 CMS 4.7 and TYPO3 CMS 6.1. Both versions reached their end of life in in October 2014. Their latest versions are 4.7.20 and 6.1.12 which were released two weeks ago mark the last ones in these branches.

    TYPO3 is encouraging its users to upgrade to the latest LTS version TYPO3 CMS 6.2, which they believe serves as the best basis for existing and new sites running with TYPO3 CMS. Only recently has TYPO3 updated their release cycle process which also gives us a glimpse of what to expect with TYPO3 CMS 7 and beyond.

    By Bryan Ruby
    Posted November 08, 2014

  • MotoCMS 3.0: Free Pre-launch Access Available

    MotoCMS 3.0: Free Pre-launch Access Available

    MotoCMS is ready for a major update that includes full responsiveness, Media Library and more great features. The great release of the major MotoCMS 3.0 update is coming in a several weeks, but a free beta version is about to be released in just a couple of days.

    By tina-zennand
    Posted November 06, 2014

  • Acquia's Digital Engagement Services expands with Lift ContextDB

    Acquia's Digital Engagement Services expands with Lift ContextDB

    Giving Brands the Power to Realize the Promise of Big Data and Deliver Smarter, More Relevant Customer Experiences through the Acquia Platform

    Acquia, the digital experience company, today introduced Acquia Lift ContextDB, the latest addition to its suite of Digital Engagement Services for the optimization of digital experiences. ContextDB is a petabyte-scale data warehouse solution that finally delivers on the long-sought ideal of automating data-driven, context-aware customer experiences.

    By CMS Report
    Posted November 04, 2014

  • Drupal Security: Not Shocking but Responsible

    Drupal Security: Not Shocking but Responsible

    Over the years, I've made it an unwritten policy not to sensationalize bug fixes and security vulnerabilities in content management systems. While there may be great interest in such stories, I believe such stories have a tendency to cause more harm than good. When sensationalized, such articles tend to cause customers to address security concerns with emotion instead of logic which is never a good thing. So, when the security vulnerability known as "Drupageddon" broke and Drupal developer Bevan Rudge posted "Your Drupal website has a backdoor", I knew this story was going to eventually reach mainstream media. In the meantime, I've been struggling on how best to write this article and what story need to be told.

    By Bryan Ruby
    Posted October 31, 2014

  • Magento: Everything you need to know about product attribute sets

    Magento: Everything you need to know about product attribute sets

    The Magento platform which delivers ecommerce solutions is a great choice for many reasons. One of them is a great bunch of functions and settings one can adjust its online store to. If you are new to Magento, you might come up with a number of questions. One of the most frequent ones is how to use product attribute sets properly.

    In this article we will provide a detailed definition of what attribute sets are and how to use them with the maximum efficiency.

    By Amasty
    Posted October 24, 2014

  • Cloud storage – Putting all your eggs in one basket

    Cloud storage – Putting all your eggs in one basket

    Cloud storage enables users to store data online. This makes data easily accessible for other users who have been given access to the files. Cloud storage reduces the need for expensive offline data storage devices and if done correctly, can save a lot of time as well as money.

    But should you put all your eggs in one basket?

    By Jeff Nevil
    Posted October 24, 2014

  • Learning Light names its top eight performing learning management systems

    Learning Light names its top eight performing learning management systems

    Learning Light, the UK-based independent e-learning industry market analyst, has produced its own thorough analysis of learning management systems (LMSs) identifying its top performers.

    Learning Light Director, David Patterson, said: “We’re aware that other organizations – notably Craig Weiss’ E-Learning 24/7 - publish lists of the top LMSs but our detailed analysis relates specifically to these LMS’s appropriateness for use by corporate training organizations and training departments in the UK. We’ve carried out this research in the light of Business Innovation and Skills (BIS)’s statement that, from September 2014, Individual Learner Records for funded further education courses must show a minimum of ten per cent of individuals’ learning via materials delivered online.

    “This is going to increase demand for LMSs in the UK – and, at present, there are some 600 LMSs from which to choose. We’ve based our analysis on the cost of ownership; features and functionalities; development pathway and future-proofing from a training industry perspective.” 

     

    By Bob Little
    Posted October 23, 2014

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